• The Menopause and Osteoporosis Link

    on Mar 21st, 2017

The Menopause and Osteoporosis Link

Osteoporosis can be considered a “silent disease,” that involves the progressive loss of bone mass. As the bones become more porous, sufferers can lose strength, acquire poor posture and be at high risk for bone fracture. Osteoporosis is a disease that affects women more than men, especially women who are postmenopausal.

Hormones, specifically estrogen, seem to have an affect on bone mass. When estrogen levels are normal or abundant (such as the years before menopause), the body can rebuild bone quicker than it loses it. However, after the age of about 30, bone breakdown occurs more rapidly. If you are a woman who has been without estrogen for a long period of time (such as in those who had early menopause), your bones are at an even greater risk for loss during the aging process.

Assessing Your Risk For Postmenopausal Osteoporosis

At North Pointe OB/GYN, we take ample time to determine your specific risk factors for osteoporosis. Our physicians look at the following to guide us in your prevention or treatment plan:

There are numerous ways to treat osteoporosis, ranging from weight bearing exercise and Calcium/Vitamin D supplements to hormone therapy and injectable medication. We promise to help you find a treatment that works for you! Call North Pointe OB/GYN today to learn your risk for postmenopausal osteoporosis.

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