Ways to Beat the Summer Heat During Pregnancy

Ways to Beat the Summer Heat During Pregnancy

Pregnancy and Georgia weather aren’t always friends in the summer. With the scorching temperatures outside, a July or August due date can make your final weeks of pregnancy extremely uncomfortable. In fact, the extra heat can sabotage your desire to remain positive and cheerful until delivery. While there is no way to turn down the thermostat outside, there are some ways you can keep your expectant body cooler and still enjoy your last summer before baby arrives.

What Makes It So Hard to Cool Off During Pregnancy?

It is no surprise that women retain a higher body temperature when they are pregnant. There are several factors that contribute to this mother-to-be heat. A primary culprit is blood volume. Did you know that the volume of blood in a woman’s body increases by 50% during pregnancy? In result, the heart is also working double-time to pump the extra blood, which gives the body plenty of warmth and circulation. Metabolic rate is also known to increase during pregnancy as a response to supporting and nurturing the additional life inside. Finally, fluctuating hormones also play a role in the higher-than-normal body temperature of a pregnant woman just like they do in menopause and menstrual cycles.

How Expectant Moms Can Get Relief from the Heat?

There are many steps that you can take to make a Georgia summer more bearable for your pregnant body. To cool off, try the following:

At North Pointe OB/GYN, we promise to provide exceptional obstetrical services, which always include helping you stay as comfortable as possible during all stages of your pregnancy. If you are experiencing light-headedness, shortness of breath, sudden swelling or other worrisome symptoms during your summer pregnancy, please let us know as soon as possible.

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