Ways to Beat the Summer Heat During Pregnancy

Ways to Beat the Summer Heat During Pregnancy

Pregnancy and Georgia weather aren’t always friends in the summer. With the scorching temperatures outside, a July or August due date can make your final weeks of pregnancy extremely uncomfortable. In fact, the extra heat can sabotage your desire to remain positive and cheerful until delivery. While there is no way to turn down the thermostat outside, there are some ways you can keep your expectant body cooler and still enjoy your last summer before baby arrives.

What Makes It So Hard to Cool Off During Pregnancy?

It is no surprise that women retain a higher body temperature when they are pregnant. There are several factors that contribute to this mother-to-be heat. A primary culprit is blood volume. Did you know that the volume of blood in a woman’s body increases by 50% during pregnancy? In result, the heart is also working double-time to pump the extra blood, which gives the body plenty of warmth and circulation. Metabolic rate is also known to increase during pregnancy as a response to supporting and nurturing the additional life inside. Finally, fluctuating hormones also play a role in the higher-than-normal body temperature of a pregnant woman just like they do in menopause and menstrual cycles.

How Expectant Moms Can Get Relief from the Heat?

There are many steps that you can take to make a Georgia summer more bearable for your pregnant body. To cool off, try the following:

At North Pointe OB/GYN, we promise to provide exceptional obstetrical services, which always include helping you stay as comfortable as possible during all stages of your pregnancy. If you are experiencing light-headedness, shortness of breath, sudden swelling or other worrisome symptoms during your summer pregnancy, please let us know as soon as possible.

You Might Also Enjoy...

Be Mindful of Your Bone Health

Is osteoporosis on your radar? If you are a woman, it should be. While this bone disease can affect anyone, women are much more vulnerable. In fact, by the age of 65, women are five times more likely to show signs of osteoporosis compared to men.

How Much Do You Know About Cervical Cancer?

According to the American Cancer Society's most recent estimates for cervical cancer in the United States, “about 14,100 new cases of invasive cervical cancer will be diagnosed and nearly 4,280 women will die from cervical cancer this year.”

Endometriosis is a Pain!

Did you know that endometriosis affects nearly 10% of reproductive age females in the world? Endometriosis is a chronic disease that involves the endometrium growing outside of the uterus.

Navigating Infertility

Infertility affects nearly 15% of United States couples. For most women, infertility is diagnosed after one year of failed conceptions. For those over 35 years old, infertility can be announced after only six months of trying to conceive.

Who Should Consider Female Sterilization

Birth control is always a very personal decision. Today, there are many different forms of contraception available for women, including permanent and more temporary methods.